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FOLLOWING RAINBOWS The Fast Times and Fleeting Fames in Gay Bangkok’s Boy Soi by Mike Maloney Independently published 150 pages, $9.99 CHOOSING TO BE GAY One Man’s Improbable…More

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MOST READERS of these pages will probably identify James Ivory as the director of those sumptuous film adaptations of E. M. Forster’s novels—Maurice, Howards End, A Room with a View. Some readers will also know that Ivory formed a decades-long personal and professional partnership with the Indian producer Ismail Merchant to make those films. Yet few readers may know about Ivory’s small-town-boy-makes-good story, or about how he has lived his life as an openly gay man for most of his ninety years, …

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IN KEEPING WITH our annual custom, we remember some people who left us during the past year—activists, writers, performers, educators, and artists who made a significant contribution to the LGBT community. They left this mortal coil at ages ranging from 28 to 94. All dates are in 2021 unless otherwise indicated.

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Tóibín knows a thing or two about famous writers who were repressed homosexuals.  Mann was not afraid to recount his furtive gay encounters in his journals.

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VETERAN ACTIVIST Peter Staley attained a new level of notoriety after appearing in David France’s Oscar-nominated documentary How to Survive a Plague (2012). The film follows several key members of ACT UP as they perform various acts of political theater, from occupying the headquarters of a big pharma corporation to draping a giant condom over the house of notorious homophobe Jesse Helms. 

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Tripp made a point of letting Kinsey know that he was homosexual and was writing a book on the subject (which became
The Homosexual Matrix).

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In 1927, Arnold Pyle (1909–1973), one of Wood’s former students, became his assistant. Pyle was eighteen and Wood, 36. Good-looking, tall, athletic, with thick black hair, the heterosexual Pyle epitomized the type of man Wood continued to fall for, over and over, throughout his life.

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Willa Cather aspired to the status of Artist while living with, and getting help from, a very intelligent woman (Edith Lewis) who had given up the arts to earn a living by selling soap.

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NO ISSUE on “the Heartland” would be complete without an article on Chicago, undoubtedly the beating heart—or is it the brain?—of this vast expanse. With this realization, I immediately thought of John D’Emilio as the logical person to contact for a targeted tutorial on Chicago’s LGBT history and culture. A longtime contributor to this magazine

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