Browsing: The Movies, Part II

November-December 2015

Blog Posts

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AS A GENRE known for pushing the boundaries of good taste, horror films occupy a unique position within American cinema. Because horror triggers an emotional response in audiences through…More

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IF YOU WERE to ask a teenage boy what he thought of a movie that was nearly devoid of women characters and was instead filled with muscular, handsome men…More

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Brush Fires in the Social Landscape is a twentieth-anniversary expanded and redesigned edition of a monograph with the same title published in 1994 by Aperture #137. Wojnarowicz had been in talks with Aperture’s editors about publishing a book of his work, but he died of AIDS in July 1992 before the project was completed.

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Davenport-Hines, a British historian and biographer, gives little space to economic theory. Yet there is a subtle case about economics to be made. What makes a great economist? asks the author.

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I Left It on the Mountain: A Memoir by Kevin Sessums St. Martin’s Press. 272 pages, $25.99 “HAVE YOU fucked the angel?” asks Hugh Jackman in the opening…More

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RUPERT BROOKE is one of those figures who continually haunt the periphery of literature, a figure of myth and uncertainty. Chief among his attributes is that he is forever linked with the generation of English poets who perished in World War I.

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Baldwin first came to the attention of a large public in 1949 with the publication of his second novel, Giovanni’s Room, about a white man’s same-sex adventures in France.

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THERE’S A UNIQUE POWER in the raw, organic evidence of an artist at work—unfinished canvases in a paint-spattered workspace, rough studies and drawings, and even the artist’s personal effects. One thinks of Francis Bacon’s famously chaotic London studio, meticulously catalogued and transported, piece by messy piece, to a Dublin museum after Bacon’s death. That quality of the artist at work comes through in Basquiat: The Unknown Notebooks

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THE TITLE of Jane Ward’s book is not meant to be ironic. Her argument is that while sexual activity between straight white men (SWM) does take place, it doesn’t mean that the participants are gay. The book is about exploring the circumstances under which this situation can be said to arise.

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