Browsing: Frenemies


September-October 2019

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A CANADIAN TRANSPLANT to Brooklyn, Richard Turner, the protagonist of James Gregor’s comedic and captivating debut novel Going Dutch, is broke, self-absorbed, somewhat befuddled, and highly appealing.

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McKuen’s turning point coincided with 1967’s Summer of Love, when hippies and other nonconformists took their rebellion against conventional norms into the streets. His stance as a melancholy nonbinary romantic placed him on the more conservative end of the counterculture. It was his ability to connect with the heartaches and longings of countless “ordinary” people that put him in sync with the moment.

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This interview was conducted by phone this past June. I had a chance to chat with Ryan about his goals in writing When Brooklyn Was Queer, the conversations he hopes to instigate, and his thoughts on the trajectory of lgbtq politics today.

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Given the times, readers will not be surprised to learn that lots of drugs and easy promiscuity figure prominently in [Rainbow Warrior]; it was the ’70s. The memoir continues into the plague years, and Baker watches his friends as they waste away and perish. But Baker survived, moving to New York City in 1994 and remaining active in LGBT political life until his death in 2017.

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Part [of We Are Everywhere] opens with the memorial held in Los Angeles in 1994 to honor Dorr Legg, cofounder of the interracial homophile social club Knights of the Clock and co-publisher of ONE, Inc., the first homophile magazine in the U.S. Attendees included pioneer gay rights activists Jim Kepner and Morris Kight as well as legendary gay rights activists and rivals Hal Call and Harry Hay…

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What remains is the problem of reconciling Rand’s professed disgust for homosexuality with her apparent fascination with it in The Fountainhead. Let’s start with the premise that Rand herself was powerfully attracted to men. When entering into the minds of some of her male characters, she may have unconsciously written her own attraction to men into their psyches, finding this a more natural writing task than describing an attraction to women.

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Most people know Andrea Dworkin as the radical feminist who launched a campaign against pornography in the 1980s and ’90s, but this is only one slice of a fascinating life of activism. I’ve recently completed a full-scale biography of Andrea Dworkin that will be published by the New Press in 2020. It’s based on her remarkably rich (and previously closed) archive at Schlesinger Library at Harvard.

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