Browsing: Weird Psychology

July – August, 2007

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… Victoria Brownworth’s latest collection of fiction. Each one can be read as an exquisite eulogy for those who don’t survive the disasters of our time-unless they become vampires or succubi. …

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IN 1938, Daphne du Maurier’s melodramatic novel, Rebecca, became an international bestseller, and Hollywood producer David O. Selznick acquired the film rights for $50,000. Also in 1938, Alfred Hitchcock, then a noted director of British-made suspense movies, signed a contract with Selznick and was soon named to direct the screen adaptation of the novel. Thus began the making of Rebecca (1940) …

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Bohemian Los Angeles and the Making of Modern Politics by Daniel Hurewitz University of California Press. 377 pages, $29.95 FOR ANGELENOS in the know, Hollywood is nothing more…More

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… She’s Not the Man I Married is both heartbreaking and, alas, rather tedious. On the one hand, it’s obvious that Boyd doesn’t want her husband to take the next step, but she loves him deeply and wonders if she can support him enough if he decides to become a “full-time woman.” …

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Short reviews of Call Me By Your Name, The Mosaic Virus, Men Who Love Men, What Becomes You, Boston Boys Club, and Gay Travels in the Muslim World.

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The following speech by the late Barbara Gittings appears as the preface to a new book published by Haworth Press, American Psychiatry and Homosexuality: An Oral History, a book of interviews edited by Jack Drescher and Joseph P. Merlino (“Preface: Show-and-Tell,” pp. xv-xx). The speech, which was delivered on the occasion of Gittings’ acceptance of the American Psychiatric Association’s Frier Award for her contribution to GLBT mental health (Oct. 7, 2006), seemed a perfect introduction to the theme of this issue.

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DAME EDNA EVERAGE is the only Tony Award-winning star who quizzes the audience and insults what they wear. Galumphing about the stage in a sensationally outré gown, purple hair and rhinestone-winged glasses, she razzes latecomers and asks them to identify themselves.

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ALAN CHAMBERS, the President of Exodus International, a group claiming to change the sexual orientation of homosexuals, sunk in his chair and squirmed as the camera closed in on his crinkled face. There was a quick cutaway to the audience where his fidgety wife, Leslie, looked as if she wanted to run to the nearest fire exit. Sensing the kill, talk show host Montel Williams asked Chambers if his organization could “change” homosexuals into heterosexuals.

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… Colour Me Kubrick tells [Alan] Conway’s story. And it should have been a fascinating film. It might have said a great deal about the cult of celebrity, about a little man’s yearning to be a big one, about belief and gullibility, about the psychological and emotional relationships between con men and their marks. …

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