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  Dying City by Christopher Shinn Produced by Lincoln Center Theater   ATTENDING A PERFORMANCE of this new drama by Christopher Shinn is something like watching a traffic accident in slow motion—and I mean that in the best way. You watch the cars coming at wrong angles in utter fascination and wish you could doMore
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The Left Coast
  Bohemian Los Angeles and the Making of Modern Politics by Daniel Hurewitz University of California Press. 377 pages, $29.95   FOR ANGELENOS in the know, Hollywood is nothing more than a neighborhood, one not nearly as interesting as Silver Lake or Echo Park. In the first half of the 20th century, this hilly enclaveMore
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IN THE PROLOGUE to his memoir, Include Me Out, Farley Granger recollects how, in December 2004, he was invited to a Luchino Visconti retrospective at the Brooklyn Academy of Music to view a restored print of Senso, the lavish 1958 melodrama in which he starred as an Austrian deserter who feigns love for a marriedMore
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ROBERT MCALMON. The name may seem familiar, but probably as an adjunct to some other writer. Born in 1895, as a teen he may have been in love with Gore Vidal’s father, as Vidal infers from McAlmon’s later novel Village. In 1921, although gay or bisexual himself, he accepted a marriage proposal from H.D.’s loverMore
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… Victoria Brownworth’s latest collection of fiction. Each one can be read as an exquisite eulogy for those who don’t survive the disasters of our time-unless they become vampires or succubi. …
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A Gender Dilemma
… She’s Not the Man I Married is both heartbreaking and, alas, rather tedious. On the one hand, it’s obvious that Boyd doesn’t want her husband to take the next step, but she loves him deeply and wonders if she can support him enough if he decides to become a “full-time woman.” …
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IN 1938, Daphne du Maurier’s melodramatic novel, Rebecca, became an international bestseller, and Hollywood producer David O. Selznick acquired the film rights for $50,000. Also in 1938, Alfred Hitchcock, then a noted director of British-made suspense movies, signed a contract with Selznick and was soon named to direct the screen adaptation of the novel. ThusMore
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Born on January 27, 1965, in Perthshire, Scotland, to Mary and Alex Cumming, Alan studied acting from a young age. He was married to Hilary Lyon from 1985 to 1993. In 2004 he met Grant Shaffer and, after a two-year romance, was married to Shaffer in a civil ceremony in early 2007 at the OldMore
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Dan Mathews, vice president of the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), is the originator of many of that organization’s most controversial campaigns against animal cruelty, notably their “I’d rather go naked than wear fur” campaign. An openly gay man, Mathews has long seen a connection between the cause of animal rights andMore
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Short reviews of Call Me By Your Name, The Mosaic Virus, Men Who Love Men, What Becomes You, Boston Boys Club, and Gay Travels in the Muslim World.
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BTW
In the News
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Letters to the Editor
Reader’s Comments
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The Kirstein Century
On the centenary of the man who brought ballet to America
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How Henry James juggled his Balzac and Flaubert in Paris
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The following speech by the late Barbara Gittings appears as the preface to a new book published by Haworth Press, American Psychiatry and Homosexuality: An Oral History, a book of interviews edited by Jack Drescher and Joseph P. Merlino (“Preface: Show-and-Tell,” pp. xv-xx). The speech, which was delivered on the occasion of Gittings’ acceptance ofMore
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ALAN CHAMBERS, the President of Exodus International, a group claiming to change the sexual orientation of homosexuals, sunk in his chair and squirmed as the camera closed in on his crinkled face. There was a quick cutaway to the audience where his fidgety wife, Leslie, looked as if she wanted to run to the nearestMore
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IN SUMMER 2005, Zachary Stark wrote in a web log about his parents’ forcing him to attend Refuge, an ex-gay outpatient program for adolescents aged thirteen to eighteen sponsored by an organization named Love In Action (LIA). While there, Zachary wrote: “[My parents] tell me that there is something psychologically wrong with me. … I’mMore
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… I sought professional help in the person of psychiatrist “Dr. Alfonzo.” In turmoil, I asked this doctor how I could best come to terms with my homosexuality as well as with the psychological effects of the sexual abuse I had endured as a child. …
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TEARS COURSED down my cheeks as I drove toward my destination. For the first time in my life I believed I had found someone who could help me with my same-sex attractions. …
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… In more recent years, the psychotherapeutic memoir and confessional poetry have both been hallmarks of bestselling literature. When it comes to modern gay life, however, no other phenomenon has so completely defined a generation as AIDS. …
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By coincidence, this issue of the G&LR spotlights two topics with which Martin Duberman is closely associated: the life and times of Lincoln Kirstein and the application of various therapies to change the sexual orientation of gay people.
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The 2007 state legislative season has been the most productive in the history of the GLBT rights movement. For the first time in our history more than half of the U.S. population will live in jurisdictions that outlaw discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation
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Can This Reader Be Saved?
The following remarks were offered by the author at a panel discussion comprised of G&LR contributors at the Equality Forum conference in Philadelphia in May. Moderated by editor Richard Schneider, the other panelists were Andrew Holleran, Mark Merlis, and Natalie Hope McDonald … much of the discussion focused on the continued viability of literary gayMore
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… Colour Me Kubrick tells [Alan] Conway’s story. And it should have been a fascinating film. It might have said a great deal about the cult of celebrity, about a little man’s yearning to be a big one, about belief and gullibility, about the psychological and emotional relationships between con men and their marks. …
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DAME EDNA EVERAGE is the only Tony Award-winning star who quizzes the audience and insults what they wear. Galumphing about the stage in a sensationally outré gown, purple hair and rhinestone-winged glasses, she razzes latecomers and asks them to identify themselves.
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