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Correspondence

Letters to the Editor

  A Shipload of Exceptions to Billy Budd Article Editors Note:Quite a few letters were received regarding errors in an essay in the July-August issue titled “For the Love of Billy Budd,” by Jeffrey Meyers, which discussed the creation of Benjamin Britten’s opera Billy Budd, based on the Herman Melville novella. Some letters were brief,More
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In Memoriam

  REGULAR READERS of this magazine will instantly recognize the name of Jim Nawrocki, who contributed to just about every issue starting in 2002. He wrote on an amazingly wide range of topics, always with a degree of authority that suggested a deep reading on the topic at hand. Jim’s death on May 31st willMore
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BTW

  Shake It!  Their wrestling may be fake, but three members of World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) have been producing a breakfast cereal called BootyO’s that’s real and edible and probably loaded with sugar—and it’s being slammed as “homosexual food” by some WWE wrestlers. One of the three partners has come forth to deny the accusation,More
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Essays

  IN THE LAST TWO DECADES, Western European nations have enjoyed mostly steady progress toward the acceptance of homosexuality. For their Eastern European counterparts, however, negative attitudes and intolerance toward homosexuality and homosexual people, or homonegativity,* continue to be remarkably prevalent, with some nations experiencing stagnation or even regression in acceptance in recent years. GayMore
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  IS IT POSSIBLE, is it legitimate, to speak of a “gay genocide” under the Nazis before and during World War II? There’s no debating that the Nazis rounded up and killed a number of people for being gay, but does this make it a “genocide” in the same sense that their program to exterminateMore
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Russia and the Art of Survival

  THE YEAR WAS 1928. The Russian poet and diarist Mikhail Kuzmin had just performed his final public reading. He had been invited by a group of students whose enthusiasm was not shared by their institute’s administrators, who had restricted the event and demanded that it not be advertised to the public. Nonetheless, a throngMore
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    Global Gay: How Gay Culture Is Changing the World by Frédéric Martel Translated by Patsy Baudoin MIT Press. 262 pages, $27.95   “IN IRAN, there are no homosexuals,” Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the president of Iran, famously said during a lecture at Columbia University when he was in New York to address the United NationsMore
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The Case of Nietzsche

  THIRTEEN YEARS after its initial publication in 1989, the great Nietzsche biography Zarathustras Geheimnis, by Joachim Köhler, appeared in an English translation. While I praised the original German edition in the Winter 1999 issue of this magazine [then The Harvard Gay & Lesbian Review], the conservative Nietzsche establishment has displayed considerably less enthusiasm. InMore
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Artist's Profile

  THIS INTERVIEW was conducted by the late Jim Nawrocki and is the last of his many contributions to this magazine. I didn’t realize how sick Jim was when he came to me with a proposal to interview his neighbor in San Francisco, Isak Lindenauer, an antique dealer whose shop, Arts & Crafts Antiques, isMore
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  FANS of the Canadian-American musician Rufus Wainwright have gotten to know him over the past two decades for his virtuosity as both a popular singer and a classical composer. By now, he has written hundreds of songs, from “Cigarettes and Chocolate Milk” (2001), which playfully catalogued his vices as a young man, to “Montauk”More
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Interview

  THIS INTERVIEW was conducted by the late Jim Nawrocki and is the last of his many contributions to this magazine. I didn’t realize how sick Jim was when he came to me with a proposal to interview his neighbor in San Francisco, Isak Lindenauer, an antique dealer whose shop, Arts & Crafts Antiques, isMore
More
  FANS of the Canadian-American musician Rufus Wainwright have gotten to know him over the past two decades for his virtuosity as both a popular singer and a classical composer. By now, he has written hundreds of songs, from “Cigarettes and Chocolate Milk” (2001), which playfully catalogued his vices as a young man, to “Montauk”More
More
  THE WORLD knows him as Peter Berlin, but his      real name is Armin Hagen Freiherr von Hoyningen-Heune. “Peter Berlin” was a stage name that he adopted upon arriving in San Francisco from Berlin, Germany, in the early 1970s—just in time to take advantage of the sexual revolution that was sweeping America. Acting as hisMore
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Briefs

    Forget the Sleepless Shores by Sonya Taaffe Lethe Press. $20.   Sonya Taaffe is a classical scholar and a poet as well as a fiction writer, and her signature style is both poetic and cosmopolitan. The stories in this collection are characterized by sights, sounds, smells, tastes, and textures, all of which haveMore
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Poetry

  Camp Marmalade by Wayne Koestenbaum Nightboat Books. 409 pages, $18.95     Camp Marmalade sounds like a nice place to send gay boys for the summer, but since it is the title of Wayne Koestenbaum’s latest book, I approach it with trepidation. For, like any summer camp, this one—despite the sweetness of its name—isMore
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Transformational Verse

  Mosaic of the Dark: Poems by Lisa Dordal Black Lawrence Press. 192 pages, $15.95   Mosaic of the Dark reads like a memoir, with Lisa Dordal’s direct, insightful poems offering linked encounters from life. A member of the English faculty at Vanderbilt, Dordal published a book of poems titled Commemoration in 2012. Her poetic talesMore
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Art

  Charlie Cinnamon: Legendary Press Agent Jewish Museum of Florida, Miami Beach June 19 to Sept. 16, 2018     IN THIS RETROSPECTIVE exhibition of the extraordinary career of Charlie Cinnamon, “preeminent theatrical press agent” to the stars, we are regaled by a collaborative tribute to his legacy in a collection of memorabilia garnered byMore
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Film

  The Gospel According to André Directed by Kate Novak Magnolia Pictures   THIS YEAR promises a bumper crop of film documentaries. Already released are films on Grace Jones, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Fred Rogers, and Pope Francis, to name a few. That motley list is made all the more unusual by the addition of TheMore
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Film Reviews

  THIS YEAR I’ve reviewed half a dozen of the ten or so films that I saw in June at the Provincetown International Film Festival—not officially an LGBT filmfest, but hey, it’s P’town. And an excellent crop of films it was this year. Richard Schneider Jr.   The Cakemaker Directed by Ofir Raul Graizer   This German-Israeli coproductionMore
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Reviews

  The Gospel According to André Directed by Kate Novak Magnolia Pictures   THIS YEAR promises a bumper crop of film documentaries. Already released are films on Grace Jones, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Fred Rogers, and Pope Francis, to name a few. That motley list is made all the more unusual by the addition of TheMore
More

Film Reviews

  THIS YEAR I’ve reviewed half a dozen of the ten or so films that I saw in June at the Provincetown International Film Festival—not officially an LGBT filmfest, but hey, it’s P’town. And an excellent crop of films it was this year. Richard Schneider Jr.   The Cakemaker Directed by Ofir Raul Graizer   This German-Israeli coproductionMore
More

The Boys Is Back

  The Boys in the Band A Play by Mart Crowley Directed by Joe Mantello   IT WAS EITHER kismet or dumb luck that the original production of The Boys in the Band appeared Off-Broadway in 1968, the year before the Stonewall Riots. Everyone of note seemed to be pulling up in his or herMore
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Theatre

The Boys Is Back

  The Boys in the Band A Play by Mart Crowley Directed by Joe Mantello   IT WAS EITHER kismet or dumb luck that the original production of The Boys in the Band appeared Off-Broadway in 1968, the year before the Stonewall Riots. Everyone of note seemed to be pulling up in his or herMore
More