Current Issue

The surprisingly satisfying resolution of Our Young Man is White’s way of showing readers, especially those for whom being gay is the norm, how to accept who they are, and where they belong, with grace.
More
Lumpen joins Dean Spade’s Normal Life, Joey Mogul, Andrea Ritchie, and Kay Whitlock’s collectively authored Queer (In)Justice, and the anthologies Captive Genders (edited by Eric Stanley and Nat Smith) and Against Equality: Prisons Will Not Protect You, edited by this writer.
More
IRIS MURDOCH has been hailed as one of the 20th century’s greatest writers, and this collection of her letters demonstrates that this is not hyperbole.
More
Short Reviews
Reviews of David Bowie’s album Blackstar, and the books: Batty Bwoy and Making a Scene: Lesbians and Community across Canada, 1964-84.
More
Cruising China
Tiantian Zheng is a straight Chinese woman who teaches anthropology at SUNY-Cortland and went back to China over the course of three years to gather data about gay men in a provincial city on the coast northeast of Beijing …
More
Musical Inventions
Describing Sondheim as “a classically trained composer who chose the theater over the concert hall and Broadway over the opera house,” Mordden points out classical influences everywhere in the master’s scores
More
In her new novel Loving Eleanor, Susan Wittig Albert imagines how one of the more well-documented relationships might have started, progressed, and concluded.
More
This memoir documents Ronnie Gilbert’s struggles to discover herself as an artist and as a woman.
More
“I’M OLD ENOUGH to justify writing about my history,” Gary Indiana remarks early on in his new memoir, “but too old to remember much of it.”
More
In Nutt’s telling, this is the story of an American family as grounded in traditional values as they come, coming to grips with a situation that they were never prepared for. They rise to the challenge because they love their kids, and they are enriched for the effort.
More
Nonacademic Interests
PAIGE SCHILT’S new memoir Queer Rock Love opens with Schilt embedded in graduate school, immersed in radical political thought and queer theory, and only beginning to realize that she is “not only politically gay” but actually gay.
More
AROUND THE TURN of the 20th century, “virile” (from the Latin virilis, manly) was an adjective frequently used by art critics to characterize American paintings. The boldest and most independent painters were conventionally designated as “virile,” while those who depended on European models were by implication not as masculine or even effeminate. Thus there wereMore
More
Aligning himself with black and Latino graffiti artists and poets on the Lower East Side, including the legendary Puerto Rican writer and ex-con Miguel Piñero, his friend and sometime lover, Wong nevertheless described himself as a “tourist” there. If indeed he felt like an outsider—and Wong, Asian and gay, could certainly look like one, flamboyantlyMore
More
  BORN into a wealthy American family, Romaine Brooks was a renowned portrait painter who lived much of her life in Paris, where she had a series of open and loving relationships with women. For all her reputation as a depressive recluse and misanthrope, Brooks was nothing of the kind. So argues Cassandra Langer inMore
More
IT WAS just about fifty years ago that singer–songwriter Janis Ian had her first hit, “Society’s Child” (1967). Nearly a decade later she released “At Seventeen” (1975), which became her signature song. Since then, she has had a multifaceted career as a recording and touring artist, and she is an accomplished writer of essays, scienceMore
More
BTW
  Little Big Man Marco Rubio is gone but not totally forgotten as a presidential contender. In the end, the Florida senator’s run may best be remembered for his bizarre exchange with Donald Trump over the relative size of each man’s penis. It was when Trump started calling Rubio “little Marco” that the latter struckMore
More
Readers’ Thoughts
  Romaine Brooks’ Legacy: An Exchange   To the Editor: Richard Canning’s review of my book Romaine Brooks: A Life [in the Jan.-Feb. 2016 issue]contains a few errors that I’d like to address. First, and most important, is Canning’s claim that well-documented evidence exists proving that Romaine Brooks was an anti-Semite and a fascist. ThereMore
More
For its first year, inter/VIEW was an underground film magazine, serving to promote Warhol’s own movies, such as Flesh and Trash. It provided Warhol easy entrée to the film crowd. Who could turn down an invitation to do an interview for inter/VIEW?
More
Silencing Israeli Activists Accomplishes Nothing
  AT THE JANUARY 2016 Creating Change conference, held in Chicago, hundreds of pro-Palestinian, anti-Israeli activists shut down a reception for Israeli LGBT activists and their American supporters. Apparently the reception followed a Shabbat service. The group sponsoring the reception was A Wider Bridge, a U.S.-based organization that “builds bridges between Israelis and lgbtq NorthMore
More
A poet and author of an award-winning novella titled Mitko (2011), Greenwell holds masters degrees from Harvard and the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, where he was an arts fellow. As he explains here, the years he spent both studying and writing poetry were instrumental in the development of his prose style. He’s an avid reader ofMore
More
Sappho Transfigured
IT SEEMS everyone’s boarding the Sappho boat these days, eager to travel with the ancient poet and tell the world who she was. One person well qualified to be Sappho’s herald and interpreter is singer, songwriter, and musician Jeri Hilderley, who pays homage to the poet with a stirring new CD, Time Traveling with Sappho.
More
IN A CORRIDOR within the British Museum is Cupboard 55, an antique wooden cabinet numbered with a bronze plaque, containing more than 1,100 objects itemized into a registry and sequestered into an archive. It was created in 1865 and known as the Museum Secretum. Until the 1960s, the Secret Museum was a storeroom of eroticaMore
More