Browsing: July-August 2020

July-August 2020

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MY NAME is Jonathan Alderete Loussaief, and I live in Grand Prairie, Texas. My husband’s name is Bilel Loussaief, and he is a gay Tunisian citizen. We fell in love and lived together for two years. Unfortunately, ICE [Immigration and Customs Enforcement] picked him up at work on July 26, 2019, and brought him to a detention center. …

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Samuel Pozzi was every-where, like a Parisian Zelig. A brilliant surgeon, he had a following in Parisian society and affairs with some of his patients.

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            The Tea Club members broke school rules by brewing tea and sneaking snacks into the library, where they engaged in passionate discussions about the role of art in civilization. When a more inviting space was discovered—an elongated compartment at the café at Barrow’s Stores in Birmingham center—the original name morphed into the Tea Club and Barrovian Society or T.C.B.S. for short.

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THE HORROR FICTION of H. P. Lovecraft (1890–1937) is best known for its tentacled monsters, demented occultists, and adjective-heavy phrases like “dissonances of exquisite morbidity and cacodaemoniacal ghastliness.” Lovecraft’s work appeared primarily in cheap pulp magazines like Weird Tales, and while he died penniless, he is now considered one of the world’s great horror writers. Toys, games, and movies based on his stories continue to pour out of the dream factories, and his writing has been the subject of academic conferences, philosophical treatises, and essays by Joyce Carol Oates. …

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IT HAS BEEN almost three decades since the publication of my novel The Confessions of Aubrey Beardsley, which is being re-issued as a digital edition. This event coincides with the first major exhibition of Beardsley’s work in fifty years, which is scheduled to open at the Tate Britain in London in June (as of press time, after a postponement due to Covid-19). Another Beardsley show is slated to open in Paris at the Musée d’Orsay in October.

            While preparing my novel for this new edition, I couldn’t help but reflect on the many years I spent researching Beardsley’s life, his art, and the circumstances that led to his downfall. It’s a story worth recounting as a reminder of the corrosive homophobia that devastated the private life and destroyed the public career of this brilliant artist. …

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Beardsley’s drawings seem to indicate that he intended to shock, even though he was safely detached from the reality of sexual experience.

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CATHERINE DE’ MEDICI, Dowager Queen of France in the age of Shakespeare, Cervantes, and Rabelais, had bad luck with her sons. Although each was to ascend a throne, as…More

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THIS ISSUE’S THEME does not refer to the long-running Off-Broadway play The Fantasticks but instead to a collection of writers and artists who might better be described as “fantasists”: those…More