Browsing: September-October 2004

September-October 2004

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Richard Mohr is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Illinois-Urbana and author of The Long Arc of Justice: Lesbian and Gay Marriage, Equality, and Rights (Columbia University Press, January 2005), from which this essay is excerpted.

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… [Henry] James very consciously represented in his person whatever intellectual aristocracy the U.S. then possessed.

This is one key to Henry James’s character, and novelist Colm Tóibín has caught it to perfection in his fiction-not novel-The Master, …

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EVEN the erudite student of gay writing will find previously unknown poets anthologized in Masquerade. I love the obscure, so I had heard of Charles Hanson Towne, George Sylvester Viereck, and Adah Isaacs Menken, although admittedly I had never actually read any of their poetry. …

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DESPITE its slender size and breezily elegant prose, Looking for Sex in Shakespeare is a richly informative and learned book that endeavors to take a fresh look at a topic that’s been on everyone’s mind for at least the last century: …

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Reviews of Complaint in the Garden, The End of Gay and the Death of Heterosexuality, and Do Everything in the Dark.

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… As David Bergman writes movingly in his new “biography” of the VQ, the story of the most famous circle of gay writers of the last generation must be placed within the context of AIDS. …

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… Our Fathers is many things: an encyclopedia of meticulous research; a who’s who of victims and perpetuators; a history of the Catholic civil rights organization, Dignity; and a compelling soap opera with first-person diary entries that sometimes border on erotica. …

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IT SEEMS appropriate that a gay scholar named Kidd would write a book about “boyology.” The term originates in the early 20th century in pseudo-sociological and pseudo-anthropological studies of boys and their behavior. …

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… As a gay man born long before the 70’s, I was stunned when the FBI responded to my résumé. David K. Johnson’s The Lavender Scare helps explain why I was so surprised. …

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