Browsing: Fall Reading

September – October, 2007

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WITHOUT APOLOGY, without frills-brought to you by Scapegoat Publishing, whose motto is “Blame Us”-Jack Malebranche hacks away at longstanding myths about the gay community in this new book. These myths as he sees them are embedded in the full title of his book, whose four elements I propose to analyze by way of review.

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IN 1955, Rose Bamberger, a Filipina lesbian, brought together four couples to form a “secret society of lesbians” in San Francisco. She wanted to be able to dance, drink, and socialize without the fear of harassment or arrest that homosexuals risked at the bars. At the first meeting someone suggested that the group be called the Daughters of Bilitis (DOB) (bil-EE-tis).

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In this memoir, which is also a cookbook, [Marusya Bociurkiw] covers some well-traveled territory in lesbian literature-a mildly dysfunctional family that was “full of ghosts,” the struggle of coming out, lesbian love affairs gone wrong, progressive politics-yet her lovely prose style elevates the mundane.

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Despite the high praise that he garnered and his place as a giant in the history of drag, Julian Eltinge is not well known anymore. At his height, he was one of the most famous and popular actors in America, performing to sellout crowds from Boston to Los Angeles.

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THE 1970’s was the golden age of gay bar guides, those little publications with pictures, personal ads, and, week after week, articles by local activists and commentators. Those articles, now mostly lost, helped form GLBT communities in towns all over America. Jack Nichols wrote hundreds of such pieces.

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FANS of Armistead Maupin’s magnificent “Tales of the City” series have a reading treat awaiting them. As the title of Maupin’s new novel reveals, Michael Tolliver-“Mouse”-is alive.

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LESLIE LARSON’S debut novel, Slipstream, captures with extraordinary vividness the ubiquitous anxieties of life in post-9/11 America.

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… In Strange Tribe, Gregory’s son John Hemingway has written a tell-all memoir that explores the Hemingway clan in all of its dysfunctionality. This book represents a gesture of contrition and healing toward his sad, dead father. …

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