Browsing: Revivals

January – February, 2013

Chris Kluwe
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Takes on news of the day

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CHARLES BEYE’S MEMOIR begins like a l9th-century novel: the narrator’s second wife, to whom he has not spoken in years, is dying, and his children are begging him to visit her. Not only does he refuse, but when she dies he suspects that she willed herself to expire just to avoid his visit. …

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VICTORY is a compendium of the events on the path to where we are today in the fight for full GLBT equality in the United States. Thus author Linda Hirshman has a lot of ground to cover, pausing on a few topics in depth, notably the AIDS epidemic, the “Don’t ask, don’t tell” policy governing military service, and marriage equality. …

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… Despite … impressive gains, the GLBT community still faces a great deal of repression in Mongolia. Freedom House detailed the difficulties the country’s first GLBT non-governmental organization (NGO) faced when trying to register with the government. …

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John Cheever
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… Cheever’s journals reveal his fear of his own homosexuality, in particular his fear that he might betray-or that others might perceive-what he is desperate to keep hidden: that his wife follows his gaze as it lingers on other men, that he indulges in an assignation with another man in the anonymity of a private train compartment, or that his highly critical mother caustically insinuates that he’s “irregular” sexually. …

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Depression: A Public Feeling by Ann Cvetkovich Duke University Press.  296 pages, $23.95 IN Depression: A Public Feeling, Ann Cvetkovich attempts to find different ways of writing and…More

last supper
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IN 2003, the controversy over The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown arose from, among other things, the book’s claim that the Catholic Church encodes forbidden knowledge in its images. An instance of this secret practice is supposedly how, in Leonardo da Vinci’s The Last Supper, there appears to be a blonde female figure seated at Christ’s right that we have always mistakenly accepted as John the Evangelist. Brown’s novel posits that the figure is really Mary Magdalene …

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… ACT UP is going to be mined by future historians, museum curators, and graduate students for all sorts of things. What France’s film does is assemble what are essentially home movies that give the viewer a visceral sense of what it was like to be at the meetings and demonstrations. Of course, a film about ACT UP is not the whole history of AIDS. A shot of the Quilt, an idea from San Francisco, reminds us how its expression of grief complemented the New Yorkers’ outrage. But try-or don’t try-to imagine AIDS without ACT UP. They fought back, fought AIDS, changed medical protocols, and saved lives. …

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… Schulman spends the first half the book talking about her “solidarity visit”-by which she means solidarity with both the Israeli and Palestinian peoples, especially GLBT people among both. … The book’s second part describes what happened when Schulman returned home, when she organized a speaking tour in the U.S. for three GLBT Palestinian-Israeli activists. …

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