Browsing: Revivals

January – February, 2013

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Told from Patrick’s perspective, Paternity Test is rich with angst and eagerness, laced with past-inflicted pain but also sprinkled with hope.

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RECOVERING or reframing history-creating a “people’s history”-has been important for all identity-based social movements, but it’s been crucial and particularly revelatory for the GLBT movement. …

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Ellen Forney is both bisexual and bipolar; she’s had to “come out” twice. In her new graphic memoir, Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo and Me, she shares the experience of coming to terms with her diagnosis and informing friends and family.

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… At 84, Albee is notoriously cagey during interviews, and enjoys a good game of cat-and-mouse, sometimes craftily switching roles with the interviewer. I spoke to the playwright shortly before the revival of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf on Broadway on October 13th-fifty years to the day of its première …

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REBELS don’t walk. They drive. Kerouac went on the road by bus and truck; Dylan is still singing about a “hopped-up Mustang Ford.” Without that now iconic 1949 Mercury, James Dean might have become a rebel without a car. Working within this automotive American tradition, veteran rocker Melissa Etheridge has titled her latest album (her twelfth) 4th Street Feeling. On its cover, the Oscar winner and two-time Grammy winner stands confidently in front of a teal Chevy Impala. A suitcase and guitar are strapped to the roof while a leather-jacketed Etheridge holds the keys as if ready to roll. “Take me away, way back to that 4th Street feeling now,” she sings on the bluesy title track, “when everything I had I could fit inside my Chevrolet.”

Working within this automotive American tradition, veteran rocker Melissa Etheridge has titled her latest album (her twelfth) 4th Street Feeling. On its cover, the Oscar winner and two-time Grammy winner stands confidently in front of a teal Chevy Impala.

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THE FIRST GAY PERSON I ever met was also the first lover who died of AIDS. Tom was an ebullient bon vivant who loved to cook, built his own clavichord, and snuck me into the Episcopal church where he was the organist to play Bach works till dawn. Unbeknownst to us when we met in 1980 (my freshman year of college), HIV was silently insinuating itself into the bloodstream of men and women around the globe. It sprung into the public’s attention in 1981 after physicians published a report on an unusual outbreak of Pneumocystic pneumonia (PCP) affecting five previously healthy young gay men in Los Angeles with weakened immune systems. …

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BASED ON THE NOVEL by Peter Cameron, the movie Someday This Pain Will Be Useful to You is a curious hybrid of international film financing and American “indie” narrative style. The story deals with a teenage boy from the hip urban haute bourgeoisie living somewhere in Manhattan or Brooklyn’s chic bohemia …

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CONSIDERING his impact upon American underground cinema, it is surprising that Andy Warhol is still known far more for his silk-screens than for his celluloid. As author and art history professor Douglas Crimp points out in his elegant and smart new book on some of Warhol’s key cinematic works, Warhol was hugely prolific, having made more than 100 films and almost 500 film portraits …

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HAILED as a watershed in the GLBT rights movement, last November’s election produced some results that could have a profound impact on the advancement of GLBT equality. Here are five take-aways from an election …

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… Stories for Boys is ostensibly about Martin’s father, who in his early sixties attempts suicide. This comes as a surprise, since the father had always seemed the rock of the family while the mother, who suffers from bipolar disease, has occasionally been hospitalized. What triggers the father’s attempted suicide is his wife’s discovery of gay pornography on their computer. …

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