Browsing: In Search of Lost Identities

March – April, 2013

0

AUTHOR of thirteen books, a play, a libretto for a dance opera, and several cut-and-paste novels, Seattle-based Rebecca Brown has been dubbed “the greatest secret of American letters” by literary bad boy Dale Peck.

More
0

Some of the most valuable chapters in My Friend Tom are the ones devoted to close readings of both Williams’ poetry and the poets who influenced him.

More
0

THE FIRST FAMOUS PERSON I wrote to when I moved to New York in 1980 was Howard Moss, the long-time poetry editor of The New Yorker. He was the one person, it seemed, that every literary figure—from W. H. Auden to Elizabeth Bishop, Lillian Hellman, or John Updike—knew and liked as a friend.

More
0

Reviews of the books Chicago Whispers:  A History of LGBT Chicago Before Stonewall, Secrets and Strangers, and A Long Day’s Evening, the play My Big Gay Italian Wedding, and the album “The Beatles” by AG.

More
0

Steve Finbow has written a brief biography of Allen Ginsberg as part of the Critical Lives series published in England.

More
0

A RELATIONSHIP can work like an addiction, giving a taste of infinite satisfaction while keeping its members clinging to each other.  In Keep the Lights On, Ira Sachs (The Delta, Forty Shades of Blue) has brilliantly documented the arc of his own troubled nine-year relationship with literary agent, author, and addict Bill Clegg.

More
0

… “How did Proust read?” it begins. “As a child, like all of us: for the plot and characters. But even at a very young age, reading was for him a very serious business, and he was outraged by the fact that it could be considered by grownups as something one did to amuse oneself.” …

More
0

Madonna, still the patron saint of scandal, has lost none of her power to piss people off.

More
0

Taylor was rarely given her due as an actor during her career, but she always saw herself as a serious actress: “The emotion has got to be there behind your eyes, behind your heart. You can never act superficially and get away with it.” Certainly her Oscar-winning performance in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1967) lay to rest any lingering doubts about her talent. In the same year, she made the underrated film Reflections in a Golden Eye, based on a Carson McCullers novel, which included a smoldering homosexual subplot. This is one of her most interesting and experimental interpretations, and critics called her performance superb.

More
0

… Golden Age is a provocative meditation on the overlapping nature of sexual love and artistic creation. Both the artist and the lover strain to grasp what is ineffable, creating in one’s mind a beauty that can never be fully realized, much less tangibly enjoyed. …

More
1 2 3