Browsing: History Questions

March – April, 2006

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… Let’s Shut Out the World, a collection of essays, stories, and other short works arranged more-or-less chronologically to come together as a kind of memoir and autobiography. Most of the pieces have appeared in other publications and in anthologies such as the popular His and Flesh and the Word series.

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STANDING IN LINE for Brokeback Mountain the afternoon it opened in Washington at a little theater near Dupont Circle, I saw two kinds of people: silent gay men of a…More

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IN LIPSHITZ SIX, or Two Angry Blondes, T Cooper writes the story of four generations of the Lipshitz family. In 1903, after an especially horrific pogrom, Hersh and Esther and their four children emigrate from Kishinev, Russia, to the United States.

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I AM STRUCK by those on the left whose hostility to Israel is so total that they ignore the fact that, by the values important to liberals, conditions inside Israel are greatly superior to those within any of its Arab neighbors. This does not mean that one needs to agree with Israel’s position on Israeli-Arab issues.

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One aspect of the corruption and bribery mega-scandal shaking Washington that’s swirling around conservative lobbyist Jack Abramoff, and which hasn’t gotten much mass media attention, is how a lot of dough from Abramoff-controlled slush funds went to leading homophobes from the religious Right.

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This charming, delightfully queer pastoral, which was originally published in 1966, has been brought back by Little Sister’s Classics, a series of books created by Arsenal Pulp Press and the Vancouver bookstore Little Sister’s to revive gay and lesbian literary classics.

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IT IS A TRUISM that Abraham Lincoln was incompetent with women. Scholars emphasize that as a young man, his awkwardness and shyness and uncouth appearance so embarrassed him that he avoided their company. He botched the niceties of courtship, tripped over himself, was almost a laughingstock. Lincoln in his twenties attempted to court a woman named Mary Owens whose verdict is widely cited in Lincoln literature: he was “deficient in those little links which make up the chain of woman’s happiness.”

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This charming, delightfully queer pastoral, which was originally published in 1966, has been brought back by Little Sister’s Classics, a series of books created by Arsenal Pulp Press and the Vancouver bookstore Little Sister’s to revive gay and lesbian literary classics.

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The Wilde debacle-he served a torturous term in prison, then exiled himself to France, where he drank himself to death-so transformed the emerging discussion of homosexual rights that it’s difficult to tell what would have happened if he hadn’t pressed his hopeless prosecution. On the one hand, Wilde put the issue of gay rights on the agenda of every socially progressive industrial country. On the other hand, he ensured that homosexuality itself would be perceived by the public as something to be stamped out ruthlessly.

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