Browsing: Anniversaries

July – August, 2008

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Short reviews of It’s Late, I Can’t Breathe, Drifting Toward Love, and The Boy with Black Eyes.

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Bennett’s omniscient narrator shows us the internal changes that give rise to the Queen’s newly broadened perspective. … And so we witness from an omniscient perspective the Queen’s transformation …

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I WROTE Homosexual: Oppression and Liberation after six months of living in New York City over the winter of 1970-71, when I was lucky enough to become part of the emerging gay liberation movement, and to work for a time on the newspaper Come Out!

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WHEN CHRIS KNIGHT was thirteen years old, his beloved father died. It appears there was no love lost between his parents: as soon as the funeral was safely over, his mother flew through the house, gathering all of her husband’s belongings. She put them in trash bags, hoping to wipe Bill Knight from her own memory and from that of her children.

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MERLIN HOLLAND is Oscar Wilde’s only grandson and the executor of his literary estate, a position he has held since 1977. A journalist and lecturer, Holland started conducting research on Wilde in the mid-1980’s. His background in industry and commerce preceded a career in academic publishing. At age 63, he is an expert on the life and work of his grandfather. While Holland himself is heterosexual, he remains outspoken against homophobia.

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“THERE IS no such thing,” Robert Leleux’s boisterous Texas mother, Jessica Wilson, once told him, “as a happy medium.” With a funny, hyper-campy yet rarely sentimental prose style, Leleux has written a tale about coming out in small-town America and his family’s made-for-TV foibles.

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AMERICA’S leading playwright provocateur, now an octogenarian, Edward

Albee—whose plays include the scalding Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?,

A Delicate Balance, Three Tall Woman, and the taboo-smashing The Goat,

or Who Is Sylvia?—is hardly resting on his accumulated laurels (three

Pulitzer prizes and three Tony awards). In fact, the playwright is now

directing new stagings of two of his one-acts, “The American Dream” and

“The Sandbox,” with the assistance of a hearing aid, and is proving as

durable as his work. …

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WHILE COCTEAU IS perhaps best known to Americans for two of the movies he wrote and directed- La belle et la bête (1946) and Orpheus (1949), which figure on most short lists of great French films-he started as a poet and always saw himself as such.

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A FROTHY COMEDY of parlor-room etiquette and sexual wish fulfillment, Phyllida and the Brotherhood of Philander is the bizarro cousin of a Jane Austen novel, in which Regency manners and nuptial expectations are turned inside out. Ann Herendeen’s novel is a lively romp in which girl meets boy, boy meets boy, and everyone falls in love and lives happily ever after.

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EIGHTY YEARS AGO, The Well of Loneliness was condemned by the English

courts as an obscene libel and “burned in the King’s furnace.” The book

was indicted and censored solely because of its lesbian theme, for its

prose has no spice or sleaze at all. Nothing very sexy goes on in it.

“She kissed her full on the lips” and “That night they were not

divided” are as hot as its descriptions of lesbian lovemaking get.

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