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The Remains of the Underground
CONSIDERING his impact upon American underground cinema, it is surprising that Andy Warhol is still known far more for his silk-screens than for his celluloid. As author and art history professor Douglas Crimp points out in his elegant and smart new book on some of Warhol’s key cinematic works, Warhol was hugely prolific, having madeMore
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On Being on the Road
The anthems of Yes I Am still verge on the overblown, which is why 4th Street Feeling strikes the right chord by hitting the brakes just a bit. With the help of producers Jacquire King (Kings of Leon, Norah Jones) and Steve Booker (Duffy), Etheridge plays all the guitars without overpowering the production.
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... Stories for Boys is ostensibly about Martin’s father, who in his early sixties attempts suicide. This comes as a surprise, since the father had always seemed the rock of the family while the mother, who suffers from bipolar disease, has occasionally been hospitalized. What triggers the father’s attempted suicide is his wife’s discovery ofMore
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IF THE SURNAME Noguchi sounds familiar, it’s probably because of Isamu Noguchi (1904-1988), the versatile and successful American artist who achieved worldwide fame not only as a sculptor, urban architect, set designer, and furniture designer, but also as a jet-setting playboy whose many romantic dalliances with movie stars, among others, often made headlines. But itMore
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A Man in Full
CHARLES BEYE’S MEMOIR begins like a l9th-century novel: the narrator’s second wife, to whom he has not spoken in years, is dying, and his children are begging him to visit her. Not only does he refuse, but when she dies he suspects that she willed herself to expire just to avoid his visit. ...
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VICTORY is a compendium of the events on the path to where we are today in the fight for full GLBT equality in the United States. Thus author Linda Hirshman has a lot of ground to cover, pausing on a few topics in depth, notably the AIDS epidemic, the “Don’t ask, don’t tell” policy governingMore
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Queering Melancholia
  Depression: A Public Feeling by Ann Cvetkovich Duke University Press.  296 pages, $23.95   IN Depression: A Public Feeling, Ann Cvetkovich attempts to find different ways of writing and thinking about depression. The book is divided into two parts. The first part, “The Depression Journals (A Memoir),” describes her own experiences of depression whileMore
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Does Israel ‘Pinkwash’?
... Schulman spends the first half the book talking about her “solidarity visit”-by which she means solidarity with both the Israeli and Palestinian peoples, especially GLBT people among both. ... The book’s second part describes what happened when Schulman returned home, when she organized a speaking tour in the U.S. for three GLBT Palestinian-Israeli activists.More
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Told from Patrick's perspective, Paternity Test is rich with angst and eagerness, laced with past-inflicted pain but also sprinkled with hope.
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Coming Out as Bi(polar)
Ellen Forney is both bisexual and bipolar; she’s had to “come out” twice. In her new graphic memoir, Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo and Me, she shares the experience of coming to terms with her diagnosis and informing friends and family.
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THE FIRST GAY PERSON I ever met was also the first lover who died of AIDS. Tom was an ebullient bon vivant who loved to cook, built his own clavichord, and snuck me into the Episcopal church where he was the organist to play Bach works till dawn. Unbeknownst to us when we met inMore
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IN 2003, the controversy over The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown arose from, among other things, the book’s claim that the Catholic Church encodes forbidden knowledge in its images. An instance of this secret practice is supposedly how, in Leonardo da Vinci’s The Last Supper, there appears to be a blonde female figure seatedMore
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BTW
Takes on news of the day
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... Cheever's journals reveal his fear of his own homosexuality, in particular his fear that he might betray-or that others might perceive-what he is desperate to keep hidden: that his wife follows his gaze as it lingers on other men, that he indulges in an assignation with another man in the anonymity of a privateMore
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... ACT UP is going to be mined by future historians, museum curators, and graduate students for all sorts of things. What France’s film does is assemble what are essentially home movies that give the viewer a visceral sense of what it was like to be at the meetings and demonstrations. Of course, a filmMore
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ASSESSING the state of the LGBT print media universe is like pinning Jell-O to a wall. Whether discussing local or national publications, the situation is changing at such an accelerated pace that no one can predict the future of these media outlets. Because of the dual spears of the economic downturn and the ascent ofMore
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Do Tell: Recovering GLBT History
RECOVERING or reframing history-creating a “people’s history”-has been important for all identity-based social movements, but it’s been crucial and particularly revelatory for the GLBT movement. ...
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BASED ON THE NOVEL by Peter Cameron, the movie Someday This Pain Will Be Useful to You is a curious hybrid of international film financing and American “indie” narrative style. The story deals with a teenage boy from the hip urban haute bourgeoisie living somewhere in Manhattan or Brooklyn’s chic bohemia ...
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Five Take-Aways from the 2012 Election
HAILED as a watershed in the GLBT rights movement, last November’s election produced some results that could have a profound impact on the advancement of GLBT equality. Here are five take-aways from an election ...
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New Push for Marriage Equality in the States
LAST November's election brought sweeping victories in the fight for marriage equality ... With this wind in our sails, other states may soon begin to move toward recognizing same-sex couples, either as eligible for full marriage or a form of civil union. ...
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Obituaries
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... Despite ... impressive gains, the GLBT community still faces a great deal of repression in Mongolia. Freedom House detailed the difficulties the country’s first GLBT non-governmental organization (NGO) faced when trying to register with the government. ...
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... At 84, Albee is notoriously cagey during interviews, and enjoys a good game of cat-and-mouse, sometimes craftily switching roles with the interviewer. I spoke to the playwright shortly before the revival of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf on Broadway on October 13th-fifty years to the day of its première ...
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